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Madison

 

The charming borough of Madison has approximately 16,000 residents and is known as “The Rose City” because of the history of commercial flower growing here. When it comes to living in Madison, residents can choose from new construction homes to classic historic homes. From older neighborhoods in a range of architectural styles to newer areas with more modern homes, Madison has character, diversity and charm. Streets throughout Madison are wide, tree-lined and well-kept. Neighborhoods include Orchard, North Street, Fairwoods, Adsleigh and Bottle Hill Historic, just to name a few.

Native American tribes farmed and hunted in the area well before the first European settlers arrived to trade. The village was established in 1715 and named Bottle Hill. Original native trails became highways and settlers identified the key locations near rivers and along these trails. The Kings Road was one of these main thoroughfares and agents collected hefty fees for it. After the Revolutionary War, the village of Madison grew into a thriving community and the county was reorganized in 1806, of which Madison was a part. The railroad provided the means for accelerated growth in the 1800s, which fueled the rose growing industry. It also brought millionaires to the country, looking for places to build estates. Many of these land developers chose Madison, and many of these historic homes are still standing. Other economic boosts came as the community went from primarily farming and flowers to a more diverse base throughout the 20th century.


















Learn more about Madison

The charming borough of Madison has approximately 16,000 residents and is known as “The Rose City” because of the history of commercial flower growing here. When it comes to living in Madison, residents can choose from new construction homes to classic historic homes. From older neighborhoods in a range of architectural styles to newer areas with more modern homes, Madison has character, diversity and charm. Streets throughout Madison are wide, tree-lined and well-kept. Neighborhoods include Orchard, North Street, Fairwoods, Adsleigh and Bottle Hill Historic, just to name a few.

Native American tribes farmed and hunted in the area well before the first European settlers arrived to trade. The village was established in 1715 and named Bottle Hill. Original native trails became highways and settlers identified the key locations near rivers and along these trails. The Kings Road was one of these main thoroughfares and agents collected hefty fees for it. After the Revolutionary War, the village of Madison grew into a thriving community and the county was reorganized in 1806, of which Madison was a part. The railroad provided the means for accelerated growth in the 1800s, which fueled the rose growing industry. It also brought millionaires to the country, looking for places to build estates. Many of these land developers chose Madison, and many of these historic homes are still standing. Other economic boosts came as the community went from primarily farming and flowers to a more diverse base throughout the 20th century.

Madison’s modern value to residents is that it is easy to get from there to Newark, New York and beyond. Transportation makes it possible for residents to get to work quickly. Main roads run nearby while New Jersey Transit’s train station in Madison is an excellent way for residents to get to and from work. There’s local bus service and limited shuttle bus service as well. The economy of the community is focused on preserving the history and making the borough a nice shopping and dining center for the area. Several planned office developments attract companies new and old to set up here in Madison. Plenty of companies like financial, legal and real estate groups, retail, service, and education thrive here.

There are several things to see and do in Madison, including the Florence and Robert Zuck Arboretum, Drew University, Fairleigh Dickenson University, and the Museum of Early Trade and Crafts. There have been many movies filmed in Madison and visitors and residents can take a walking tour to check out locations where some of their favorite scenes were made. Other things to do nearby include intercollegiate sports and community sports leagues for adults and youth. Residents of Madison enjoy many perks of living here. There are plenty of hiking and biking trails in the borough where residents can enjoy the outdoors and stay fit. Festivals provide fun and camaraderie with the YMCA bocce tournament, Chamber of Commerce Holiday Walk, Memorial Day Parade, Le Bazar de Noel, Bottle Hill Day, and so many more.

The schools in Madison are quite excellent and are managed by the Madison Public Schools department. There are three elementary schools, one junior high school and one high school. Several private schools are in or near Madison as well. Drew University, established in 1867, is also part of Madison’s education legacy and brings a range of academic events such as lectures, art exhibits and more.

It’s no wonder that Madison is consistently appearing at the top of many people’s lists for best places to live in the state.